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Going Loco! - The Locomotives of the London Extension: Contents

Pick a page to read by clicking on its title in the list below:

No. Title Description
1  Early Years - The Pre-Robinson Era  The first successful locomotive engineer of the Manchester, Sheffield & Lincolnshire Railway was Charles Sacre. Sacre produced a number of 2-4-0 and 0-6-0 locomotive desig...
2  The Locomotives of John G. Robinson  The opening of the London Extension in 1899 meant that the Great Central Railway, as the Manchester, Sheffield & Lincolnshire Railway had now become, would need faster tra...
3  Robinson's Early Passenger Locomotives  This quite magnificent photograph is thought to have been taken around 1905 near Birstall, Leicester. Running at speed along the cutting is a John G. Robinson designed 4-4-0 C...
4  The Need For Speed and Power.  This locomotive is Great Central Railway, class 8B 4-4-2 'Atlantic' type locomotive, No. 266. It was designed by John G. Robinson in 1903 and was one of a batch built for the ...
5  Robinson Develops His Designs  To improve the fledgling passenger services on the Great Central Railway, Sir Sam Fay requested that new fast passenger locomotives be built, and the result was the two John G...
6  The Heavy Freight Designs of John G. Robinson  John G. Robinson produced his most successful design, the class 8K (later O4) heavy freight 2-8-0, in 1911. This particular example was built at Gorton Works in 1912 and is th...
7  The 1923 Grouping and Sir Nigel Gresley  In 1923, the Great Central Railway became part of the London & North Eastern Railway, and with the change of ownership came a change of Chief Engineer. John Robinson was o...
8  From Gresley to Thompson  Undoubtedly the most famous products that Beyer Peacock turned out were the Garratt type articulated locomotives. These machines were very popular in Africa and the Far East, ...
9  The Midland Interlopers  Britain's railways were Nationalised in 1947, and the old London Extension became part of British Railways' Eastern Region. During this time, the former LNER locomotives maint...
10  The British Railways 'Standards'  World War II saw much of Europe's railway infrastructure devastated by invasion and bombing. To counter the situation, Britain's War Department produced two types of cheap, lo...
11  The Last Years of the Great Central!  The completion of the Woodhead Route (Manchester to Sheffield) electrification in 1954 saw steam services gradually give way to the new electric locomotives. Here we see one o...
12  The Brill Branch Locomotives  The Brill Branch, or Wotton Tramway, was built in the 1870's to serve the Duke of Buckingham's estate and was originally worked as a horse tramway. This ramshackle railway tr...
13  On Metropolitan Lines  The first standard gauge locomotives built for the Metropolitan Railway were the now famous Beyer Peacock 4-4-0, 'A' class tank locomotives. The initial order was for eighteen...
14  T. F. Clark and Charles Jones Locomotives  The first true Metropolitan Railway design appeared in 1896 with the emergence of the 'E' class 0-4-4 tank locomotives. They were they work of T. F. Clark, and were an enlarge...
15  Metropolitan Super Power  The photograph on the right is a fine study of the Metropolitan Railway's 'H' class, 4-4-4 tank locomotive, No. 106 (works no. 4091), which was one of eight such engines built...
16  All Change at Rickmansworth!  In 1925, electrification of the Metropolitan Railway reached Rickmansworth, and much use was made of the new electric locomotives. However, the Metropolitan's operation still ...
17  The Electric Metropolitan   In 1902, the Metropolitan Railway placed an order with the company of Brown, Marshalls for a batch of vehicles that would make up the Met's first electric trains. These, and ...
18  And Finally . . . !  Strictly speaking, this locomotive is neither a Metropolitan Railway or Great Central Railway machine, but is still worthy of mention in this section. It is London Transport's...