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'All Change!' - The Rise and Fall of Leicester Central Station: Contents

Pick a page to read by clicking on its title in the list below:

No. Title Description
1  Leicester, Railways and Ancient Rome  At the end of the 19th Century, the Leicester parishes of All Saints, Blackfriars and St. Nicholas would not have been the most pleasant of places to live. A look at an Ordnan...
2  The Railway Cometh!  The construction of the new railway was the responsibility of the hired contractors, and in the case of Leicester, this was Henry Lovatt of Wolverhampton. Getting the railway ...
3  A Suitable Location  The station confines were situated between Northgate Street to the north and Bath Lane to the south. Once over the impressive new 'bowstring' girder bridge over Northgate Stre...
4  The Grand Fa'ade  The majority of passengers who used Leicester Central station would have arrived via the main entrance on Great Central Street. The first thing they would have seen as they ap...
5  The Layout of the Station  As mentioned previously in this account, the main platform at Leicester Central was of the island type. It was 1,300 ft long and 85 ft at its widest point, although it did tap...
6  All Shipshape and Leicester Fashion!  Unlike the modern railway station where one person carries out a wide range of duties, Leicester Central station in the early 1900's was a hive of activity and employment. The...
7  From Wheel-Tappers to Porters  One of the more unusual jobs found at Leicester Central was the job of the carriage and wagon inspector, or wheel-tapper as they were affectionately known. When a train paused...
8  Tickets and Truncheons  Guards were not strictly speaking part of the station staff, but nevertheless, Newton felt it appropriate to capture the image of some of these important men for prosperity. A...
9  The Offices  The Parcels Office at Leicester Central was a very busy place and employed several Parcels Clerks. The range of items carried by the railway ranged from gifts and presents to ...
10  World War I and the Railway Grouping  The first decade of the London Extension's life was a very testing time for the Great Central Railway Company and for the staff at Leicester Central. For it was during this pe...
11  The LNER Takes Control  The new London & North Eastern Railway (LNER) made several changes to its acquired railway system, and some of these would have been noticeable at Leicester Central. A new...
12  Nationalisation!  The end of the war in 1945 also saw a Labour government come to power and with it came the proposal for nationalisation. The idea had been around since the end of the 19th Cen...
13  The Fall of Dr. Beeching's Axe  It is often said that the end of the London Extension came about on 3rd September 1966. In a sense, this is true, but it certainly was not the end of the line - so to speak. I...
14  After the Last Train  After the last train on 5th May 1969, Leicester Central was locked up and left to rot. The remaining tracks were lifted and either reused or sold for scrap. Much of the once g...
15  Leicester Central in 2003: Part I  So what can still be seen of Leicester Central today?

Approaching the station from the southern end of Great Central Street, it is difficult to tell that the railwa...
16  Leicester Central in 2003: Part II  Outside the confines of the station, there are still several things to see. All Saints Road bridge is still in position, although Welles Street and Soar Lane have both lost th...